• We are available for your help 24/7
  • Email: info@isindexing.com, submission@isindexing.com


Journal of Neurology, Psychiatry and Brain Research

Journal Papers (27) Details Call for Paper Manuscript submission Publication Ethics Contact Authors' Guide Line
1 Let’s Relax! An Immersion Virtual Reality Relaxation Intervention for Quality of Life Improvement of Cancer Patients   , Sant Chawla3, Bryan Li2*, Seiya Liu4, Erlinda Gordon3, Seniha Ipekci2, Seiji Liu2, Steven Siegel1, Mika Liu5 1University of Southern California Dept of Psychiatry, Los Angeles, CA, USA 2IFGvr Inc, Los Angeles, USA 3California Sarcoma Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA 4Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA 5Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA  
Background and Significance: Interventions that reduce mental distress and enhance positive feelings are crucial for improving quality of life and, conceivably, overall survival of cancer patients. One remedy is the immersive virtual reality relaxation (VR-R) environments to inspire an emotion-focused coping mechanism in cancer patients. Patients and Methods: Twelve normal volunteers and 50 cancer patient volunteers underwent VR-R training and used the Let’s Relax!TM VR-R environment/s for 5-30 minutes. VR-R is a software-based simulation, which allows an individual to be placed inside an experience, hearing and interacting with stimuli that correspond with visual images of an artificial world. After the immersion VR-R intervention, patients reported on their experience during the VR-R intervention by answering a QoL questionnaire created by Cancer Center of Southern California/Sarcoma Oncology Center, University of Southern California Dept of Psychiatry, and IFGCURE Inc. Results: Safety Analysis: Ten of 12 normal volunteers had no adverse reactions. Eight of 50 (16%) patients experienced mild motion sickness as the only adverse event associated with its use. Forty-one of 50 (82%) patients had no adverse reactions. Efficacy Analysis: Table 1 shows the emotions that patients reportedly experienced during VR-R intervention. Table 2 shows a point scoring system using yes/no questionnaire or a modified EORTC QLQ C-30 v3 questionnaire.
2 Some Significant Trends in Biodegradable Surgical Sutures , Narayan Gokarneshan *
The article highlights some significant trends in biodegradable surgical sutures. Surgical site infections (SSIs) are one of the most common nosocomial infections, which can result in serious complications after surgical interventions. Foreign materials such as implants or surgical sutures are optimal surfaces for the adherence of bacteria and subsequent colonization and biofilm formation. Two types of sutures made by two different biopolymers were tested in terms of hydrolytic biodegradation in phosphate buffered saline solution, which simulates the physiological conditions, varying the pH of the medium and the immersion time.
3 Penetration in the Nature of the Brain Mental Activity , Yumatov Evgeny A*
The brain is a unique organization in nature, having the psychic activity, which is expressed in subjective states: thoughts, feelings, emotions. Knowledge of the nature of mental activity of the brain is the most urgent and the most challenging task of physiology. Historically the neurophysiology developed on the basis of physical and chemical laws discovered in an inanimate nature. Our investigation is devoted towards the origin of a human subjective state, and presents a methodology for studying of the nature psychic brain activity (E.A. Yumatov, 2014, 2017). We have established the existence of physical phenomena unique for the living brain so-called “Psychogenic field”, which reflects the psychic state of human brain. The subjective state of a human being was shown to affect remotely the physicochemical properties of the blood. The interaction of neurophysiological and psychic processes is described in the context of systemic organization of a wakefulness and sleep. An original schematic diagram is presented to describe the formation of the brain psychic activity. This approach is based on the feedback influence of a psychogenic field on neuronal molecular processes (self-induction in the brain). We propose a paradigm for the origin of psychic state and possible existence of the fields, which are unique for the brain. The presented scheme and paradigm of systemic organization of psychic activity of the brain are a prerequisite for the subsequent development of the theory consciousness.
4 Chiropractic and Mental Health: History and Review of Putative Neurobiological Mechanisms , Christopher Kent*
The chiropractic profession has a long history of acknowledging the relationship between nervous system function and mental health. This paper reviews the history of chiropractic involvement in mental health issues, chiropractic institutions specializing in the care of mental health problems, and the putative neurobiological mechanisms associated with vertebral subluxation and dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system
5 Light and Electron Microscopic Study of Degeneration of Central Myelinated Axons in Human Traumatic Brain Injuries , Orlando J. Castejón*
In traumatic brain injuries of human edematous cerebral cortex degenerated myelinated axons in the gray matter underwent varicose fiber swelling, clear and dark types of axonal degeneration, myelin sheath vacuolization and distortion, formation of myelin ovoids, invagination and retraction of axoplasm, rupture of axolemma, cytoskeletal disruption featured by increased or reduced number of neurofilaments and fragmentation of microtubules, retraction of axoplasm, enlargement of periaxonal space, and partial or total disappearance of axoplasmic organelles. Phagocytosis of degenerated myelinated axons by reactive oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, microglial cells, and non-nervous professional phagocytes is observed in mild and severe traumatic brain edema. Some biochemical events are postulated underlying myelinated axonal degeneration.
6 Morphopathological Changes of Dendrites in the Edematous Human Cerebral Cortex , Orlando J. Castejón*
Swollen and beaded dendrites exhibit fragmentation of limiting plasma membrane, cytomembranes and cytoskeletal structures. The swollen dendrites show vacuolization, dense residual bodies, enlarged rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and edematous clear and dark mitochondria. The multifactorial processes associated with brain edema and brain ischemia, such as calcium overload, activation of calcium-dependent proteolitic enzymes, protein aggregation, glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, release of lysosomal enzymes, deficit of ATP, stress oxidative and lipid peroxidation have been considered in relation with pathological dendritic changes. Dendrotoxicity due to brain edema and brain ischemia seems to be the fundamental pathogenetic mechanism underlying the dendritic damage.
7 Chronic Effect of Ethanol Ingestion on Flunitrazepam Binding to GABA Receptors of Rat Brain Synaptosoms Effect of ethanol on GABA receptors , Manoochehr Messripour*
Purpose: Changes in the CNS functions associated with ethanol ingestion are suggested to be related to the involvement of several neurotransmitter receptor systems, including the GABA receptor complex. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of chronic exposure of ethanol ingestion on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) - benzodiazepine receptor complex in four rat brain regions. Materials and Methods: Male Wistarrats were housed with food and drinking water/ethanol (85%+15% v/v). After 13 months of chronic ethanol consumption, the rats were killed by decapitation and the brain regions dissected and the synaptosome fractions prepared on Ficoll-sucrose gradient centrifugation procedure(4°C). The resulting pellet was resuspended in 1 ml of Tris-Hclbuffer (pH 7.4) and binding assay carried out in the presence of [3H] Flunitrazepam. Results: Chronic ethanol ingestion by the rat resulted in an increase of receptor affinity in the striatum and hippocampus, and a decrease in the receptor affinity in the cerebellum and frontal cortex. GABA receptor density, as assessed by GABA-benzodiazepine binding (B max), was decreased insignificantly in the all brain regions studied. The different responses of GABA receptor affinity of the brain regions to chronic ethanol ingestion may result from quantitative differences in the distribution of GABA-ergic neurons in the tested brain areas. Conclusions: The increase in the affinity of the striatum and hippocampus and the decreased affinity of the cerebellum and frontal cortex suggested that up-regulation of these receptors may be Induced by chronic ethanol ingestion.
8 The War Within: A Personal Journey with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder/Complex Post Traumatic Disorder-The Struggle, the Fight, and Recovery , Lucy Faranda*
For years, I had suffered from OCD. I have been in and out of many psychiatric facilities both in the United States and in Canada. My experiences are complicated but also very informative for those seeking help with OCD. I have been in many crisis situations and have endured many treatments like CBT, mindfulness, guided meditation, ERP, hospitalization, and withstanding very intense OCD and CPTSD residential treatment programs. In time, with the right medical team, support groups, medication and self-motivation to fight against the debilitating symptoms OCD, I have gone from being on LTD for the inability to function and complete daily tasks like showering and dressing without compulsions, to reclaiming back my life and returning back to teaching. I hope to be able to pay it forward and speak to the great resources and staff available at Sunnybrook Hospital. I hope to share my story of struggle and recovery to help bring resource information and hope for those suffering from any mental illness. I have seen the good, the bad and the ugly. But, I have also seen hope and light. I now am able to know how it feels to be able to function again, as well as acknowledge a strength that I could never have known I had if it was not for the experiences I endured. I have the authority to now say OCD is not a life sentence, OCD can, in fact, be managed. I can be the voice that I so desperately needed years ago, when all I wanted to do was end my life because I had a lack of experience around me of seeing those who made it, those who survived and not just survived, but thrive into productive individuals who are able to manage their OCD and be successful
9 Book Review ‘Mempertingkatkan Harga Diri: Membina Semula Diri Untuk Kejayaan’ (Malay Version) , Uqbah Iqbal*
10 Let’s Relax! An Immersion Virtual Reality Relaxation Intervention for Quality of Life Improvement of Cancer Patients , Sant Chawla, Bryan Li*, Seiya Liu, Erlinda Gordon, Seniha Ipekci, Seiji Liu, Steven Siegel , Mika Liu
Background and Significance: Interventions that reduce mental distress and enhance positive feelings are crucial for improving quality of life and, conceivably, overall survival of cancer patients. One remedy is the immersive virtual reality relaxation (VR-R) environments to inspire an emotion-focused coping mechanism in cancer patients. Patients and Methods: Twelve normal volunteers and 50 cancer patient volunteers underwent VR-R training and used the Let’s Relax! TM VR-R environment/s for 5-30 minutes. VR-R is a software-based simulation, which allows an individual to be placed inside an experience, hearing and interacting with stimuli that correspond with visual images of an artificial world. After the immersion VR-R intervention, patients reported on their experience during the VR-R intervention by answering a QoL questionnaire created by Cancer Center of Southern California/Sarcoma Oncology Center, University of Southern California Dept of Psychiatry, and IFGCURE Inc. Results: Safety Analysis: Ten of 12 normal volunteers had no adverse reactions. Eight of 50 (16%) patients experienced mild motion sickness as the only adverse event associated with its use. Forty-one of 50 (82%) patients had no adverse reactions. Efficacy Analysis: Table 1 shows the emotions that patients reportedly experienced during VR-R intervention. Table 2 shows a point scoring system using yes/no questionnaire or a modified EORTC QLQ C-30 v3 questionnaire.
11 Concomitant Radio-Fluorescence-Guided Surgery in High Grade Glioma. Cohorte Study , Piloto López Orestes*
This article provides an overview of the process undertaken by occupational therapy practitioners (OT) when providing services for clients with psychosocial disorders. The occupational therapy process is the client-centered delivery of occupational therapy services. The process includes evaluation and intervention to achieve targeted outcomes. The stages of the process and the dynamic interactions among the different aspects of the process are emphasized. The occupational therapy process is a dynamic and evolving process with the targeted outcome of enhancing client’s independence, safety, and quality of functional performance and improving engagement in meaningful and purposeful occupations. Understanding of its aspects and the dynamic interaction among them help occupational therapists develop clinical decision making reasoning skills and make occupational therapy services more effective.
12 The Occupational Therapy Process in Psychosocial Disorders: An Overview , Hassan Izzeddin Sarsak*
This article provides an overview of the process undertaken by occupational therapy practitioners (OT) when providing services for clients with psychosocial disorders. The occupational therapy process is the client-centered delivery of occupational therapy services. The process includes evaluation and intervention to achieve targeted outcomes. The stages of the process and the dynamic interactions among the different aspects of the process are emphasized. The occupational therapy process is a dynamic and evolving process with the targeted outcome of enhancing client’s independence, safety, and quality of functional performance and improving engagement in meaningful and purposeful occupations. Understanding of its aspects and the dynamic interaction among them help occupational therapists develop clinical decision making reasoning skills and make occupational therapy services more effective.
13 Effects of Cyber Bullying on Teenagers; a short review of Literature , Mir Ali Raza Talpur, Tabinda Touseef, Syed Daniyal Ahmed Jilanee, Muhammad Mubashir Shabu, Ali Khan*
Among the numerous advantages of the internet, there is an unintended outcome of the internet’s extensive reach: the growing rate of harmful offences against children and teens. Cyber-bullying victimization has recently received a fair amount of attention due to some heart-breaking events orbiting in schools and even at homes. Although research has already demonstrated a number of serious consequences of cyber-victimization, many questions remain unanswered concerning the impact of cyber-bullying. This study gathers literature from 18 studies pieces together only the factors that kick-start cyber-bullying perpetration and victimization but also the effects of bullying on the victims as well as the bullies.
14 Consciousness , Mette Mouritsen*
15 The Quantitative Distribution of the Hormones of Love and Neurotransmitters at Psycho Emotional Stresses , Nugzar G Aleksidze*
In the article the results of studies of quantitative changes in the hormones of love under psycho emotional stress are examined. It is shown that for all emotional loads, the brain plays the leading role in pacing the psycho emotional load by mediating the hormones of love (oxytocin, vasopressin) and neurotransmitters (epinephrin, serotonin, dopamin) which are controlled by the brain. Three forms of love are considered: lust, attraction and attachment, which when men and elsewhere are really amazed by love and cannot think of another. The libido is also estimated-the passion of love by Freud and Jung. The data on five structural formations of the brain responsible for the attraction of love are given. It is shown that pray is one of the ways of psychotherapy.
16 Five Psychosocial Factors of the Formation of Killer and Self- Killer Organisms and their Prevention , Nugzar G Aleksidze*
The psychobiological factors of the formation of killer and self-killer organisms have been investigated. It was established that the neural correlate of aggressive and killer organisms is serotonin. Its content in the brain of aggressive and killer organisms is about 50% lower compared to normal ones. Five psycho biological factors of the prevention of killer and self-killer organisms’ formation, comprising adequate nutrition and physical exercises have been demonstrated.
17 Biochemical Basics of Alzheimer's Disease , Nugzar G Aleksidze*
The biochemical basics of Alzheimer’s disease are considered in the article at the level of neurotoxic amyloid level and the prevention measures, which may decrease the risks of Alzheimer’s disease.
18 Brain Injury and Trauma and Changes in Personality , Sam Vaknin*
Certain medical conditions can activate the narcissistic defense mechanism. Chronic ailments are likely to lead to the emergence of narcissistic traits or a narcissistic personality style. Traumas (such as brain injuries) have been known to induce states of mind akin to full-blown personality disorders. Such "narcissism", though, is reversible and tends to be ameliorated or disappear altogether when the underlying medical problem does. Other disorders, like the Bipolar Disorder (mania-depression) are characterized by mood swings that are not brought about by external events (endogenous, not exogenous). But the narcissist's mood swings are strictly the results of external events (as he perceives and interprets them, of course).
19 The Effects of Virtual Reality on Mental Wellness: A Literature Review , Kayla Roche, Sant Chawla, Stephen Liu*, Steven Siegel
Virtual Reality (VR) has been gaining popularity as a means to tackle a variety of issues in medicine and beyond, one of which is improving individuals‟ mental wellness. The purpose of this review is to examine the body of research specific to the application of VR in improving mental wellness, oftentimes in the context of physical illness or disability. Using keywords “Virtual Reality”, “Mental Wellness”, “Mental Health”, “Mood”, “Stress”, “Distress”, and “Quality of Life”, a search of the literature was conducted and 22 articles were identified for inclusion in this review. Results suggest that in many cases VR has been effective in improving various attributes of mental wellness in a variety of samples, and that the quality of the VR technology itself may play a role in these results. Overall, more research considering the long-term and large-scale effects of VR, as well as clarifying which technological features of VR are most successful, should be conducted in order to strengthen the applicability of VR for mental wellness in clinical settings.
20 Corpus Callosum Gliomas , Alejandro Guala*, Popescu, Castro Barros, Bonilla, Pallini
Gliomas are the most frequent primary neoplasm in the central nervous system. Of these only 3.8% infiltrate white matter structures corresponding to the corpus callosum. Deciding which therapeutic realize in these cases results on a hard debate in the neurosurgery practice. Natural evolution of corpus callosum gliomas determines a progressive neurological deterioration in a short period of time leaving a severely neurological affection, and a short dead afterwards. Aggressive therapeutic prolongs the survival for this patient whit a high risk of neurological deficit.
21 Neuroschistosomiasis Mimicking High Grade Glioma , Jorge Dornellys da Silva Lapa*, Bruno Lazaro Rangel, Alan Chester Feitosa de Jesus, Ivison Xavier Duarte, Ronald Alves Barcellos, Arthur Maynart Pereira Oliveira
A Brazilian 25-year-old woman presented frontal headache, generalized tonic clonic crisis and left hemiparesis of crural predominance. No lesions were observed by unenhanced CT and after 30 days of discharge an enhanced MRI showed an image suggestive of high-grade glioma.
22 Beyond Impulsivity: Behavioral Disinhibition in ADHD , Mostafa Showraki*, Houman Soltani
      There is a general behavioral disinhibition beyond impulsivity in ADHD that leads to risk taking behaviors such as careless driving, substance use, and many other negative consequences or complications. Behavioral disinihibtion (BD) as a frontal and specifically prefrontal cortex pathology, has been seen long in injuries and pathologies to this area of the brain, leading to uncontrolled behavior, is a centerpiece of symptoms cluster in ADHD-HI (Hyper-Impulsive) subtype. The first aim of this paper is to confirm the existence of a general behavioral disinhibition beyond the already recognized one in cognitive domain. The second goal of the study is to identify if there is a link between this phenotype and risk taking, misconduct behaviors and substance use. Lastly we have sought to determine whether there is a correlation between major symptom clusters of ADHD, -i.e. hyperactivity and impulsivity to behavioral disinhibition.       The result of this original study confirms the common presence of behavioral disinhibition as a major symptom cluster in ADHD-HI. We were also able to show a positive correlation exists between the symptoms of hyperactivity and impulsivity with behavioral disinhibition. Furthermore, there is an even stronger link between behavioral disinhibition and risk taking, misconduct behaviors, and substance use, than with hyperactivity and impulsivity. In conclusion, behavioral disinhibition in untreated ADHD demands recognition, treatment, and prevention.
23  PTSD or Clinical Endocannabinoid Deficiency? , Joseph Rosado, MD, MBA*
Objective: A literature review was conducted supporting the theory of clinical endocannabinoid deficiency as it relates to PTSD together with a review on how to treat PTSD with medical cannabis. Background: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric disorder that can occur in people who have experienced or witnessed a traumatic event such as a natural disaster, a serious accident, a terrorist act, war/combat, rape or other violent personal assault. The following statistics are based on the U.S. population: About 7 or 8 out of every 100 people (or 7-8% of the population) will have PTSD at some point in their lives. About 8 million adults have PTSD during a given year. This is only a small portion of those who have gone through a trauma. About 10 of every 100 women (or 10%) develop PTSD sometime in their lives compared with about 4 of every 100 men (or 4%).       In the United States, New Mexico was the first state to list post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a condition for the use of medical cannabis. In a study published in Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, there was greater than 75% reduction in Clinician Administered Posttraumatic Scale for DSM-IV (CAPS) and it was concluded that Cannabis is associated with reductions in PTSD symptoms in some patients. Approximately 15% of US Veterans who are treated in    Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) outpatient PTSD clinics report recent (past 6 months) cannabis use.       The theory of clinical endocannabinoid deficiency (CED) was presented in 2001 in two publications, but more thoroughly explored in 2004 in an article that has subsequently been cited frequently in the literature, it is based on the concept that many brain disorders are associated with neurotransmitter deficiencies, affecting acetylcholine in Alzheimer's disease, dopamine in parkinsonian syndromes, serotonin and norepinephrine in depression, and that a comparable deficiency in endocannabinoid levels might be manifest similarly in certain disorders that display predictable clinical features as sequelae of this deficiency. Design/Methods: A literature review was conducted of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine PubMed from 2001-2019 specific to the topic of PTSD and Clinical Endocannabinoid Deficiency. Conclusion: This literature review supports the feasibility of cannabis-based medicine as a promising treatment option in individuals with PTSD. Based on the promising results, it is recommended that large, double blind, placebo controlled cross-over trials be launched in jurisdictions where medical cannabis can be studied without limitations from the federal government.
24 The Effects of Musical Training on Brain Plasticity and Cognitive Processes , Justine Ker, Stephen Nelson*
The link between musical training and its effects on brain plasticity have been studied since the early 20th century neuroanatomy research of Ramon y Cajal. In recent decades, studies have observed the contributions of musical training in enhancing auditory, motor, and language processing areas of the brain. The ability of musical training to impact behavior and critical thinking skills may also open the door for new methods of combating age- and illness-related cognitive decline [1, 2]. Therefore, understanding the ways in which musical training gives rise to neuroplastic change and its benefits for cognitive function will provide insight into its role in brain development.       One effective method of studying brain differences is through deformation-based morphometry (DBM), which detects changes in brain size through units of voxel expansions or contractions with reference to an MRI. Using DBM, one longitudinal research study by Hyde et al. [3] of 31 children determined that structural brain changes could be seen in as little as 15 months of instrumental musical training. Compared to a control group enrolled in group singing and playing drums/bells, the children enrolled in weekly half-hour private piano lessons showed marked increases in the voxel size of brain areas including motor and auditory cortexes, which significantly correlated to improvements in finger-motor and melody/rhythmic tasks, respectively. Hyde et al. further demonstrated that similar size differences are found in adult musicians compared to non-musicians, which suggests better planning, execution, and control of motor skills and refined auditory processing across a musician’s life-span. As a result, Hyde et al. suggests a potential to use musical training as a form of intervention for children and adults with developmental disorders and neurological diseases.       Other studies direct their focus solely towards the impact of musical training on the auditory aspects of brain processing, specifically on musicians’ abilities to differentiate sounds. In one 2012 study by Strait et al. [4] of 31 normal-hearing youths, musically trained participants displayed faster auditory brainstem response timing indicated by their heightened ability to discern words from “speech-shaped noise,” meaningless sounds that have similar auditory properties of words. When placed in a soundproof booth and asked to identify words mixed with speech-shaped noises, the musicians outperformed the non-musicians in both the speed of their response and attention to the words. These results suggest a developmental role of instrumental musical training in the shaping of neurosensory function. Such contributions leave consideration for the use of musical training as a means of therapy for auditory-based learning impairments, such as language impairment, developmental dyslexia, and auditory processing disorders.       Similar speech encoding studies further support the idea that musical training leads to enhanced listening and language skills, as well as better integration of cortical processes, such as the cooperation of motor and multi-sensory networks [5, 6]. In addition, areas such as the cerebellum responsible for balance, coordination, and proprioception are structurally different in musicians compared to non-musicians. This is due to a wide range of skills necessary to play an instrument, including the translation and interpretation of foreign symbols into a target sound and using a combination of upper body, arm, and finger movements to produce the sound. As a result, musicians often engage in a “multisensory motor experience” that contributes to large brain differences between musicians and non-musicians in adulthood [7].       Many of the enhanced brain processes identified in these studies last into adulthood [4], which supports the idea that there is high plasticity in the nervous system at an early age. Some research suggests that this “window of opportunity” occurs before the age of seven [7], but musical training could be capable of extending this period of heightened plasticity into teenage years [6]. Some studies suggest that training-induced plasticity is possible even in the mature brain. While there is little research on this subject, studies on brain plasticity in adults have shown that adults who continuously practice a skill, such as taxi-driving or juggling, observe increases in gray matter in certain areas of the brain. There is evidence that musical training has been successfully used in post-stroke rehabilitation of motor skills in the upper extremities [8]. Furthermore, one 2002 study found greater gray matter densities in Broca’s area of male symphony orchestra musicians, whereas non-musicians displayed decreased total brain volumes compared to musicians. These results suggest an ability to delay age-related cognitive decline with continued musical training [9].
25 Female Psyche after Trauma: Sexual Assault Survivor Morbidity & Mortality: Neuroplasticity & (AI); Enhancing Clinical Outcomes , Rose-Marie Boylan*
Clinical, Social, Civil & Political Interventions-Decision-Making       "The United States Institute of Medicine released a 1999 report called "To Err is Human". It indicated between 44,000-98,000 deaths occurred in the U.S. every year due to medical error. Part of this problem likely relates to low “Proximity of effect” in bioethics which distances the decision-maker from the lived reality of the patient and/or subject.       Artificial intelligence (AI), health economics, health outcomes (patient reported outcomes) combined with Bioethics & Jane Loevinger's principles of ego development have the potential to train artificial neural networks (ANNs) as statistical learning, deep learning models which emulate the most objective assessment for a survivor’s wellbeing.       Following trauma, the mind can be modified with neuroplasticity to design a better clinical outcome for victims of violence, turning them into survivors not victims. Substances that cloud judgment leading to more violence need to be evaluated based on subjective interests, stigma and questions of social conditions & risk of more violence due to clouding of the pre-frontal cortex and higher executive functioning of the brain in females. Research suggests the use of interventions that facilitate neuroplasticity with a person with trauma, can develop the mind & brain neuroplasticity to a higher level. The highest levels of emotional, cognitive and moral intelligence.       By weaving together bioinformatics and patterns of recognition using neuroplasticity modalities and artificial neural networks with artificial intelligence (AI) for clinical decision-making we can reduce adverse events, improve disability indexes, economic development & outcomes in mind health. We discuss the best minds and how we can preserve them through objective decision-analytic tools & bioinformatics using AI technology. Specifically focused on the female psyche.       Rose-Marie Boylan, BSc. M.A. has worked across 10 of the largest & mid-sized pharmaceutical companies for over 27 years. She is a healthcare professional by trade. She has specialized in patient access to medicines, patient reported outcomes, health & economics, policy influence for patient self-sovereignty. In parallel, Rose-Marie has researched for over 13 years social, civil and political cost-consequence & cost-benefit of psychiatry, transpersonal psychology & human flourishing in violence survivors. This included a Master’s research on the best brains of leaders & humans for social progress reviewing over 76 years of research.       She completed her Masters in 2009 in Leadership Studies with research on the optimum levels that humans can attain in a life time for self-actualization, human potential, economic development & human flourishing. Leveraging the research of Abraham Maslow & Jane Loevinger on ego development she developed a model which defines mind health vs. psychopathologies. Which when combined with bioinformatics by applying artificial intelligence (machine learning/deep learning) to diagnostic and clinical decision-making there is potential to improve morbidity & reduce mortality in survivors of sexual, economic, structural and physical violence. This research demonstrates that after trauma we can create the best brains from the female psyche or male psyche for social progress & economic development through post-traumatic growth.
26 An Evaluation of Active Mental Health, Wellbeing and Suicide Intervention Using the TUFMINDS Program , John McIntosh*, Elizabeth McIntosh
Background: Suicide rates are not falling despite increasing expenditure and effort. Historically individuals in mental health crises have delays in accessing treatment so a universal, community based, online program that provides active mental health and suicide intervention has potential for significant benefit. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy, acceptability and safety of the TUFMINDS program to deliver video-based education. This includes active processes to improve mental wellbeing, resilience and coping and mood scores as well as suicide knowledge and self-efficacy for active intervention, provided in a passive manner with participants watching videos modules. Method: 66 participants in two businesses attended 6 hours of training watching the TUFMINDS video program with pre and post questionnaires evaluating the changes. Results: Participants showed significant improvement in optimism, resilience, depression, anxiety and stress scores as well as reduction in mental health stigma. The improvements in suicide knowledge, skills, confidence and willingness to assist others were also dramatically increased. There was no evidence of any iatrogenic effects from the training. Limitations: The lack of a control group, small sample size, lack of follow up, use of non-validated methods are the limitations of this study. Conclusions: Direct video training can be effective to increase mental resilience and wellbeing, reduce depression, anxiety and stress while improving suicide knowledge and willingness to assist others in the suicidal crises. This study supports the proposal that mental health interventions can be provided in video or digital formats without professional input across communities safely and effectively.
27 Epilepsy and Schooling: A Review of The Literature , SOUNGA BANDZOUZI Prince Eliot Galieni*, MOTOULA LATOU Dina Happhia, DIATEWA Josue, MPANDZOU Ghislain Armel, DIOUF MBOUROU Nelly, SOW Adjaratou, BASS MODJI Anna, OSSOU-NGUIET Paul Macaire, N’DIAYE Moustapha