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International Body Psychotherapy Journal

Journal Papers (22) Details Call for Paper Manuscript submission Publication Ethics Contact Authors' Guide Line
1 What Disgust Means for Complex Traumatized / Dissociative Patients: A Pilot Study from an Outpatient Practice, Ralf Vogt
Although complex traumatized / dissociative patients frequently become traumatized under repelling circumstances, the role of repulsion or disgust has, until now, only been researched sparingly in the field of psychotraumatology. A few exceptions can be found in the field of psychosomatics, but in contrast with its brethren of basic emotions - fear, shame and grief (depression) - disgust does seem, however subconsciously, to be a taboo subject for both patients and trauma therapists. We are therefore happy to report that this pilot study, which was conducted in an outpatient psychotherapy practice with a sample size of 71 patients, was able to raise a number of new hypotheses regarding this hitherto neglected emotion. Disgust may turn out to be an important diagnostic indicator. Our research showed that patients suffering from complex psychological trauma tended to suffer more from symptoms of disgust. They could also only overcome their disgust with exceedingly more difficulty than other client groups. Memories of disgust, which hark back to sexual abuse and violence inside the patients own family, acquire special significance, as the patient is unable to digest these repellent experiences. Instead, the disgust they experience in such instances descends into the depths of the unconscious where it dwells for years. Symptoms of disgust, however oblique and concealed, coincide significantly with other psychosomatic symptoms, often exacerbating existing phobias, aggressive behaviour and shame. Lastly, this article will also briefly look at ways of treating disgust effectively with the aid of interactive and physically oriented settings. Abstracts of this article are to be found on
2 Organismic Self-Regulation in Kurt Goldsteins Holistic Approach , Luigi Corsi
The author presents a brief intellectual biography of Kurt Goldstein which focuses on the concept of organismic self-regulation the true leitmotiv of his entire theorization, beginning from the Frankfurt (1914-1930) and Berlin (1930-1933) periods, across the long period spent in the U.S. (he was one of the first victims of the Nazi persecutions), and up to his death in New York in September 1965. In particular, emphasis is given to the gradual shifting of his thinking from an unmistakably neurophysiological plane, which in The Organism leads to the formulation of the basic biological law: Equalization toward an adequate average level in an adequate time a law that seemingly takes us back to Walter Cannons homeostatic regulation principle to a more philosophical, existential, and ontological plane, which underlies the concept of self-realization. Abstracts of this article are to be found on the EABP website in the following languages: Albanian, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Serbian, Spanish. http://www.eabp.org/publications-journal.php
3 Anxiety and Panic in Reichian Analysis , Genovino Ferri
Having underlined evolutionistic aspects, the constituent moments of the fear phenomenon in a descriptive interpretation are evaluated, as well as clarifying the original roots of the words, which sink their definitions into corporal expression. The anxiety disorders are reviewed later, from a clinical perspective, linking them to significant epidemiological data which is useful in order to classify them threedimensionally in negentropic-filogenetic time. This interpretation will lead onto a clinical-analytical proposal for three-dimensional classification (The Tree of Fears) on the negentropic-ontogenetic arrow of time. The work will conclude with the description of analytical-therapeutic lines on the subject from the Italian School of Reichian Analysis (SIAR) itself. Abstracts of this article are to be found on the EABP website in the following languages: Albanian, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Serbian, Spanish. http://www.eabp.org/publications-journal.php
4 When the Therapist is Aroused: Sexual Feelings in the Therapy Room, Merete Holm Brantbjerg
This article focuses on the therapists self-regulatory skills as vital to the process of addressing sexual feelings as part of psychotherapeutic interaction. How do we support ourselves as psychotherapists in containing and exploring sexual feelings, impulses and thought patterns while staying within the ethical boundaries of a psychotherapeutic relationship? Psychomotor exercises with precise individual dosing are described to support containment of sexual arousal. Training in gender skills through psychomotor awareness is a pathway to replacing old automatic, defensive strategies with containment and coping anchored in the present. Abstracts of this article are to be found on the EABP website in the following languages: Albanian, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Serbian, Spanish. http://www.eabp.org/publications-journal.php
5 Forming an Embodied Life: The Difference between Being Bodied and Forming an Embodied Life, Stanley Keleman
The humans ability to make transitions in its age shapes, socially and personally, produces distress, anxiety, and doubt about how to behave. One response is to become overly reliant on inherited responses. An alternative response is to use voluntary muscular influence and the formative dynamic to manage and resolve cortical emotional organismic dilemmas. The body is an organized environment, a structure of excitatory vitality and experiential knowledge, and a source of the personal and collective wisdom of knowing. Voluntary muscular effort extends this power, making it possible to participate in how we give body to experience and make memories. Abstracts of this article are to be found on the EABP website in the following languages: Albanian, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Serbian, Spanish. http://www.eabp.org/publications-journal.php
6 The Relational Turn and Body Psychotherapy IV. Gliding on the Strings that Connect Us Resonance in Relational Body Psychotherapy, Asaf Rolef Ben-Shahar
This is the fourth and last paper of the series The Relational Turn and Body Psychotherapy. These papers examined the touching points between body psychotherapy and the exciting and encompassing field of relational psychoanalysis. The first paper From Ballroom Dance to Five Rhythms (Rolef Ben-Shahar, 2010), explored some basic concepts in relational psychotherapy. It also pointed out the relevance of relational thinking to the history and practice of body psychotherapy. The second paper Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue (Rolef Ben-Shahar, 2011a) expanded the discussion on intersubjectivity and examined the balance between regressive and novel aspects of intersubjectivity. The third paper (Rolef Ben-Shahar, 2011b) explored connections between somatic, linguistic and relational organizations, and the place of the self in relational body psychotherapy. This last paper will demonstrate the use of resonance in body psychotherapy within a relational framework, borrowing from psychoanalytic framework, from Jungian and from shamanic traditions. The paper is dedicated with love to Yanina. Abstracts of all articles are to be found on the EABP website in the following languages: Albanian, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Serbian, Spanish. http://www.eabp.org/publications-journal.php
7 From Hopeless Solitude to the Sense of Being-With: Functions and Dysfunctions of Mirror Neurons in Post Traumatic Syndromes , Maurizio Stupiggia
Here the focus is on the therapeutic relationship: the trauma of abuse is a relational trauma. It must be said that abused people are sensitive to gestures, sensory and motor fragments, etc. This work attempts to repair the relationship texture, as the person has lost the sense of being-with and feels desperately alone. The work of mirroring, the joined repetition of the key gesture, and the search for gesture-word connections help the patient to repair that breach. This methodology can promote the recovery of the functionality of the mirror neuron system, and the reactivation of the insula and the amygdala, thus restoring the previously lost ability to communicate. Abstracts of this article are to be found on the EABP website in the following languages: Albanian, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Serbian, Spanish. http://www.eabp.org/publications-journal.php
8 What Disgust Means for Complex Traumatized / Dissociative Patients: A Pilot Study from an Outpatient Practice, Ralf Vogt
Although complex traumatized / dissociative patients frequently become traumatized under repelling circumstances, the role of repulsion or disgust has, until now, only been researched sparingly in the field of psychotraumatology. A few exceptions can be found in the field of psychosomatics, but in contrast with its brethren of basic emotions - fear, shame and grief (depression) - disgust does seem, however subconsciously, to be a taboo subject for both patients and trauma therapists. We are therefore happy to report that this pilot study, which was conducted in an outpatient psychotherapy practice with a sample size of 71 patients, was able to raise a number of new hypotheses regarding this hitherto neglected emotion. Disgust may turn out to be an important diagnostic indicator. Our research showed that patients suffering from complex psychological trauma tended to suffer more from symptoms of disgust. They could also only overcome their disgust with exceedingly more difficulty than other client groups. Memories of disgust, which hark back to sexual abuse and violence inside the patients own family, acquire special significance, as the patient is unable to digest these repellent experiences. Instead, the disgust they experience in such instances descends into the depths of the unconscious where it dwells for years. Symptoms of disgust, however oblique and concealed, coincide significantly with other psychosomatic symptoms, often exacerbating existing phobias, aggressive behaviour and shame. Lastly, this article will also briefly look at ways of treating disgust effectively with the aid of interactive and physically oriented settings. Abstracts of this article are to be found on the EABP website in the following languages: Albanian, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Serbian, Spanish. http://www.eabp.org/publications-journal.php
9 In Support Of Body Psychotherapy , Will Davis
After an introduction to body psychotherapy, there is a discussion of the trend in verbal and cognitive therapies to include the body. This trend will be highlighted via a comparison with body psychotherapy as well as references to cases. There is then a description of body psychotherapys unique contributions to psychotherapy at large and photos of a patient showing physical changes during six months of body psychotherapy treatment.
10 Gender as a Relational Somatic Experience: How Psychotherapists Participate in Gendering Clients (An Experiential Conversation), Gary Glickman
This paper articulates a study of gender role-playing by a focus group of bodycentered psychotherapists familiar with Relational Somatic Psychotherapy (RSP), in hopes RSP might offer a lens for helping clients understand their embodied gender experiences, and for helping clinicians understand how wittingly or unwittingly they might be participating in gendering their clients. That is, to whatever extent therapists are not aiming to help bring consciousness to a persons sense of identity regarding gender (as with any other culturally reinforced identity), they might be colluding to limit it. A workshop introduction is articulated, followed by a review of gender literature relevant to psychotherapy, a description of methodology, results from the groups roleplay experiences, and suggestions for further study.
11 The Ever Changing Constancy of Body Psychotherapy , Robert Hilton
Presented at the 2012 USABP Conference, this keynote address outlines both historical theories that have informed todays body psychotherapy and contemporary trends of thought in the field. Robert Lewis, Alexander Lowen, Donald Winnicott, Harry Guntrip, Ronald Fairbairn and Wilhelm Reich, as well as Donald Kalsched, Dan Siegel and Peter Levine are all given mention, sandwiched between illustrations borrowed from poetry and Hiltons own anecdotes. Hope is proposed for a humanistic, sympathetic future of body psychotherapy.
12 Hyporesponse: The Hidden Challenge in Coping With Stress, Merete Holm Brantbjerg
This article addresses the role of hyporesponse in stress management. The concept of muscle response is presentedregarding both hyperresponse (tension) and hyporesponse (giving up) and how these two defensive strategies interact and easily polarize. Building up energy and precision in dosing is presented as a strategy to modify hyporesponse and, through that, lower the risk of losing contact with parts of the self in different phases of stress. Interconnectedness between high arousal statesboth hyper- and hypoarousal and muscle response patterns are addressed and special attention is given to potential consequences of hyporesponse in the transitions between the different levels of arousal that occur in daily life.
13 Nina Bull: The Work, Life and Legacy of a Somatic Pioneer , Daniel J. Lewis
Nina Bull is a significant albeit underappreciated figure in the history of body psychotherapy. She was a pioneer in the study of the mind/body relationship and the role of the musculature in subjective experience. She is best known as a teacher and mentor to Stanley Keleman, the founder of Formative Psychology. Still, her life largely remains a mystery as little has been done in the way of compiling information about her work or personal life. This paper presents a synopsis of her attitude theory, describes the experiments she conducted to confirm her theory, discusses the relationship of her work and Formative Psychology, and presents original historical study of the events and attitudes that informed her research.
14 Efficiency of Psychotherapy Involving Altered States of Consciousness: A Call to Reconsider Our Spiritual Stance at the Clinic, Rachel Shalit
This paper deals with the efficiency of psychotherapy, particularly when involving techniques that stimulate altered states of consciousness (ASC). One main conclusion arising from research in this field is defined well by Bogart (1991), who asserts that ASC may profoundly reorient an individuals identity, emotional attitude, sense of wellbeing and purpose in life. Body-oriented techniques have the potential to induce ASC; therefore, a methodological exploration of the ASC realm as part of body psychotherapy is called for. Moreover, as ASC may also trigger spiritual experiences, it is my belief that embracing the correspondence between the body and the spirit holds great promise for clients. The paper discusses three main subjects: 1. Altered states of consciousness what they are, ways of inducing them 2. The efficiency of psychotherapy 3. The correlation of body psychotherapy with consciousness and spirituality In italics appear questions and dilemmas, in some instances as an introduction to a paragraph, in other instances as issues raised for further contemplation.
15 Sense and Sensibility in Supervision, Sibylle Huerta Krefft
This article addresses enhancing supervisory knowledge and skills through the dimension of body psychotherapy, which has received decisive support for its empirical and theoretical approach through recent neurobiological findings. Learning, including learning under supervision, is related to the structure of the relationship between the parties involved and is most effective when the body and emotions are engaged. Learning is a bodily process and can be described neuroscientifically. Stress in the short term reduces learning potential and long-term performance anxiety leads to burnout. Utilization of the pulsation model of body psychotherapy can also, on the career level, help to alleviate exaggerated expectations. Critical instability, in fact, is necessary for change. The goal of this paper is to clearly outline the relevance of body psychotherapy for supervision and at the same time to caution against an all too great simplification. In view of the continual rise in stress-related illnesses, this approach is becoming increasingly important.
16 Bridging the Split: Integrating Psychodynamic and Body-Centered Therapies, Claire Haiman
An exploratory study examining the ways in which psychotherapists trained in psychodynamic and body-centered therapies integrate, or choose not to integrate, the two theoretical traditions in their clinical work. Eleven dually trained clinicians were interviewed, all of whom integrated their work to some degree. The majority made use of assimilative integration, incorporating body-centered techniques into a psychodynamic framework. Differences and similarities are discussed with regard to transference/countertransference, conceptualization of patient experience, technical interventions, and psychoeducation of patients regarding integrated work. Concerns about touch are also briefed addressed.
17 Broken Boundaries, Invaded Territories: The Challenges of Containment in Trauma Work, Morit Heitzler
One of the most excruciating aspects of trauma is the invasion or collapse of boundaries, not just as experienced in the moment of trauma, but also as experienced as lasting damage. Traumatised clients usually bring to therapy an ongoing background feeling of threat: both to physical and emotional survival and to their sense of identity. Not knowing where I end and the Other begins creates chaos and confusion in the clients inner world, which echoes strongly in the therapeutic relationship. Therefore, most methods of trauma therapy are highly concerned with re-building and establishing safe, containing boundaries as the foundation of any therapeutic work. However, is it really possible to by-pass the clients embodied experience of shattered safety by introducing safe therapeutic boundaries? Can we, as therapists, contain the impact of trauma without engaging with chaos, confusion and vulnerability in the consulting room? This paper will explore the paradoxical nature of boundaries and containment and their role in trauma therapy.
18 Yoga Based Body Psychotherapy: A Yoga Based and Body Centered Approach to Counseling , Livia Shapiro
This paper presents Yoga Based Body Psychotherapy, a five-stage approach to counseling high-functioning adult clients. This approach utilizes yoga postures and developmental movement patterning to assess, identify and support the processes of growth and change in clients by expanding their developmental edge. Yoga Based Body Psychotherapy pairs yoga principles called the Universal Principles of Alignment with the developmental movement pattern known as the Five Fundamental Actions, within a framework for counseling called the Interaction Cycle. The aim of this approach is twofold: to overtly bring yoga postures into the context of body psychotherapy to support further development of body-centered ways of counseling, and to afford a new lens for the practice of yoga postures by making their inherently therapeutic nature overt in the context of a psychotherapy session so that eliciting emotional material becomes a potentially viable content for healing, growth and change. A brief review of the literature covering yoga therapy, yoga in psychotherapy and yoga in body psychotherapy is offered with outlines of the Universal Principles of Alignment, the Five Fundamental Actions and the Interaction Cycle. Yoga Based Body Psychotherapy is then explicated and examples for application are provided. Further considerations exploring where this approach might go in the future and limitations conclude this paper.
19 Tandem Hypnotherapy, P. Jzsef Vas and Nomi Csszr
Tandem hypnotherapy (THT) has recently been developed by the authors. It is a group hypnotherapeutic method for resolving psychic and psychosomatic pathology originating from pre/perinatal traumas. While multi-person touching happens, the patient and the co-therapist go into hypnosis together. Meanwhile, the therapist keeps a distance. A mutual attunement evolves during THT. By using THT the symptoms of pre/perinatal traumas can be replaced with an associative mode of prenatal experiencing which includes acceptance and love. The essence of THT is viewed as an integration of touch, trance, and transference. Three case vignettes are presented to illustrate how THT works.
20 Idealism and the Goals of a Psychotherapeutic Process, Michael C. Heller
This paper deals with the difficulty of proposing a short explicit list of the aims of a psychotherapeutic treatment that can be accepted by most psychotherapists. It presents a series of issues on the subject as a form of "mind sharpeners" for colleagues. In the first part I will show that a discussion on the aims of psychotherapy often raises implicit ideological issues such as those which are inspired by various sorts of philosophical idealism. I will then specify what we would need from scientific research to improve our understanding of the aims of psychotherapeutic processes. And finally I will discuss a few issues that haunt me when I practice psychotherapy.
21 Idealism and the Goals of a Psychotherapeutic Process, Michael C. Heller
This paper deals with the difficulty of proposing a short explicit list of the aims of a psychotherapeutic treatment that can be accepted by most psychotherapists. It presents a series of issues on the subject as a form of mind sharpeners for colleagues. In the first part I will show that a discussion on the aims of psychotherapy often raises implicit ideological issues such as those which are inspired by various sorts of philosophical idealism. I will then specify what we would need from scientific research to improve our understanding of the aims of psychotherapeutic processes. And finally I will discuss a few issues that haunt me when I practice psychotherapy.
22 Body Image Disorders, Bernhard Schlage
INTERNATIONAL BODY PSYCHOTHERAPY JOURNALTHE ART AND SCIENCE OF SOMATIC PRAXISINTERNATIONAL BODY PSYCHOTHERAPY JOURNALTHE ART AND SCIENCE OF SOMATIC PRAXISBODY IMAGE DISORDERS3938Body Image DisordersBernhard Schlage, MAReceived 12 November 2012; received in revised form July 2013; accepted August 2013AbstractComing out of a childhood experience of an expanded body image, this paper postulates the existence of a so-called second body, a body different from but linked to the physical body and how this body relates to parts of the brain. Drawing on historical and cross-cultural research, the author shows how this second body can help us toward a better understanding and therapy of various body image disorders and phenomena, such as anorexia/bulimia, neuropathies, dream states, body dissociations, and body neglect phenomena. This article seeks to avoid descriptions of phenomena in practice, and instead focuses on different definitions and models of understanding in the hope of coming to new modes of working with these phenomena.