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Paper Details

Surviving Mucormycosis: Impact on Psychological Well-Being and Quality of Life

Surviving Mucormycosis: Impact on Psychological Well-Being and Quality of Life

Ankesh Singh and Ayushi Gupta

Journal Title:Acta Scientific Otolaryngology
Abstract


Mucormycosis is a rare but serious fungal infection commonly affects the sinuses/lungs after inhalation of fungal spores from the air, usually affecting people with a compromised immune system. In the wake of COVID-19 pandemic, a multi-fold rise was seen in cases of mucormycosis or “black fungus” which was earlier a rare entity. This has added a great burden on the patients and their caregivers physically, financially, emotionally as well as psychologically. The high morbidity and mortality rates of mucormycosis can cause psychological impairment and decreased quality of life. Along with the patients and their caregivers, the treating doctors are also in duress as informing the family members about the poor prognosis of such an acute disease takes a toll every day. Most patients require a combined approach of surgical debridement and Liposomal Amphotericin B. The unavailability of Amphotericin B has led to suboptimal dosages in many patients in India. Loss a sense organ(s) like eye in cases of orbital involvement or any other part of the body like maxilla or palate, can lead to dependence on others for care and one’s own perception of themselves as a member of the society. Psychiatric manifestations can be a direct accompaniment in the aftermath of surgical debridement/ resection procedure for Mucormycosis. Addressing psychological functioning sequelae related with Mucormycosis, especially after surgical treatment for the disease; along with rehabilitation and psychotherapeutic sessions should be encouraged as a part of treatment in patients of Mucormycosis such that they continue to be functioning members of the society. Keywords: Mucormycosis; Black Fungus; COVID-19; Psychological Impairment; Rehabilitation